Rigor and Justice Planning:


What are the sections/pieces to your project?
(Divide the writing of your project into separate pieces…i.e. rationale, mission statement, implementation, goals, etc. These pieces will be different for every group. Decide how your group wants to handle them)

Rationale (Tory and Natalie - Student Interviews, plus group write-up)
Mission (Group)
Procedures/Policy (Group; Rewards/Consequences specifically - Natasha and Emily)
Goals/Objectives (Group)
Curriculum (Group)


What are the specific goals or objectives for your project?

We will be creating an alternative charter school for young women who are pregnant or have children and would not be given adequate support for academic success in a mainstream high school settting.

Mission:
o To create an environment in which young mothers can receive an excellent high school education. Students receive access to a diverse and specialized skill set that will allow them to achieve both academically and socially, in order to provide a better future for themselves and for their families.

Goals/Objectives:
o Improve quality of life, not just for mothers, but also for their children
o Health/nutrition
o Mothers will be able to…
§ Know how to care for a child/infant’s daily needs
§ Provide balanced nutrition for self and child
§ Set growth goals for child and self
§ Spread literacy to children (nightly reading assignments)
§ Demonstrate mastery of state academic standards (either Regents or Portfolio)
§ Complete in at least two work-study/internship programs
· 9/10th grade: campus-based jobs
· 11th/12th: external jobs/internships


What specific, concrete steps will your group propose to achieve these goals?

See rough draft below

What are your ends in mind? How will you know if your project is successful?

We hope to create a supportive, nurturing environment that simultaneously provides students with a rigorous curriculum and prepares them for college success or success in the working world, while also providing an environment where they feel comfortable learning the skills they need to raise their children and support their families.

What creative and persuasive ways are you planning on presenting this project to us?

As part of our rationale, we will be including testimonials from students with children. We hope to represent, with this visual representation, why we have chosen this particular project and why it is important to us.

ROUGH DRAFT NOTES:

Rationale
o Requires research (can be interview-based as well as text-based)
o Young, teen mothers are not served by the traditional high school system/consistently fail
§ Dropout rate high
§ Even those who work hard, desire success, still face road blocks (“baby” blocks)
§ Inability to succeed in school creating vicious cycle of their children not succeeding in school
§ Also require a whole new set of skills, now that they are mothers
o Why take teen moms out of traditional school system
§ Different set of demands they are going to have to meet in the next years of their lives
§ This focused attention in their education allows us to provide them with other services (daycare, jobs/income, internship)
§ Breaking the cycle of government dependence
§ Health insurance – offering to our students, so that they can raise their children with adequate healthcare
o Interviews:
§ Testimonials about raising children and being a high school student
Mission
o To create an environment in which young mothers can receive an excellent high school education. Students receive access to a diverse and specialized skill set that will allow them to achieve both academically and socially, in order to provide a better future for themselves and for their families.
Procedures/Policy
o Partner with Headstart? – help with funding
o Admissions
§ Lottery system
§ Students can be admitted at the beginning of any year, 9-12
§ Will admit new students when we have the capacity
§ Goal is to retain students
o Regents-based school?
o Tracked classes
§ Childcare courses based on age of child
§ Academic classes based on grade level
o Accept students at the semester but no one mid-semester
§ Must be pregnant or have child/children
§ 65 students/grade
o Dress Code
o Staff
§ 2 English; 2 Math
o Number of Students
§ 65 students per grade
o Contract between student and school (students can be expelled)
§ Strict attendance policy
§ All students understand that they are under contract
§ Also require a person to co-sign contract with them
o All mothers offered healthcare for them and their children
o Daycare will be provided to all children, with the understanding that all mothers must complete provide service hours at the center and complete academic coursework (academic and family care)
Rewards and Consequences for Rigor and Justice Project
Demerit System
· 3 strikes, you’re out
· How can students receive a “strike”?
o Students fail one or more classes for the marking period (students have ample opportunity to succeed – teachers offer extra help and support; students should be taking advantage of this)
o Students fail to appear for their work shift at the daycare, their internship, etc.
o Students are late 3 times or more to their work shift at the daycare, their internship, etc.
o Students are late to class 3 or more times
o Any display of violence towards others
o Students removed from class 2 or more times for behavior that is disruptive to class
· If student receives a strike, student must meet with teacher/coordinator of job/internship to discuss improvement/action plan; if the strike is a result of violent or disruptive behavior, student must meet with school counselor to discuss improvement/action plan
Reward System
· All students carry an ID with them at all times
· Their IDs hold credit on them
o System is all online; students can access through school email accounts
o At least once a week in their beginning of the day advisory, students check their balance and manage their school account
· Credit can be earned both by displaying positive behavior and academic/employment excellence
o Behavior: Teachers can award to students who display care for others, set good examples for classmates and children, etc. – this type of credit offered in classes by the teacher of the class; as many students as are deserving can earn credits during a particular class
§ Most credits a student can receive during a period: 2
§ Teachers remove credits if a student is late to class; displays disruptive class behavior; treats other students/teacher with disrespect
o Academic/Employment: students can receive weekly credits if they are able to maintain 85 or above in classes; if they continue to show strong effort/performance in work at daycare/internship site
· Credits used in school store for school supplies, childcare supplies, nutritional snacks, school “gear”

Goals/Objectives
o Improve quality of life, not just for mothers, but also for their children
o Health/nutrition
o Mothers will be able to…
§ Know how to care for a child/infant’s daily needs
§ Provide balanced nutrition for self and child
§ Set growth goals for child and self
§ Spread literacy to children (nightly reading assignments)
§ Demonstrate mastery of state academic standards (either Regents or Portfolio)
§ Complete in at least two work-study/internship programs
· 9/10th grade: campus-based jobs
· 11th/12th: external jobs/internships

Curriculum
o Portfolio School and defense
o 5 days per week – all academic classes before lunch
o 1st period class: advisory/homeroom
§ administrative concerns; check-in in the morning
§ current event of the day/newspaper read
o 9-10th grade team
o 11-12th grade team
o Each teacher in charge of a pod; has two preps; book club with small reading groups (tracked by reading level)
o Advisories same as reading group
§ Beginning and end of the day (advisory beginning and reading end)
o Freshman Year:
§ English: World Lit I (includes Shakespeare; nonfiction; award-winning author; poetry; at least one novel and possibility of one other play)
§ Social Studies: Global History I
§ Math: Algebra I
§ Science: Biology
o Sophomore Year:
§ English: World Lit II
§ Social Studies: Global History II (includes Shakespeare; nonfiction; award-winning author; poetry; at least one novel and possibility of one other play)
§ Math: Geometry
§ Science: Chemistry
o Junior Year:
§ English: American Lit
§ Social Studies: American History
§ Math: Pre-calculus or Statistics
§ Science: Physics
o Senior Year:
§ English: Creative Writing/Journalism
§ Social Studies: Government/Economics
§ Math: Calculus or Statistics
§ Science: Anatomy
o Other Courses: (2 instructors)
§ Personal Finance
§ Nutrition/Health
§ Human Development – Parenting, Sex, Child Psychology and Development
§ Gym – step; yoga; pilates; aerobics (exercise a part of the day)
· A/B weeks for Gym/Daycare
o All grades work in the daycare
§ Elective Teachers can also be in charge of literacy groups
o Saturday School (Trips)
§ Museums; Job Shadow; some trips with children and others without
§ Junior/Senior afternoons – work/study program where they go to serve at a job as an intern
o Enrichment Programs
§ Once a week: “family dinner” – all students invited
· Use cafeteria kitchens
§ Lamaz